Berkshire Hathaway n.3

Leite

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
16/9/06
Messaggi
3.059
Punti reazioni
150
dall'intervista a Matthew Peterson sul Daily Journal di Munger:
https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/value...ing/files/files/Graham&Doddsville_Issue37.pdf

Many people are familiar with Charlie Munger, but what many people might not know that, for over 40 years, Munger has been running another company called Daily Journal. It’s a publishing company, but it’s also technology company. Daily Journal has a hiddenbusiness model, and it's not at all about newspapers. It’s very misunderstood and there are zero analysts, zero investor relations. They have significant off-financial statements value, they have deferred revenue, and they have accelerated costs. I think it’s undervalued from both a Ben Graham and a Phil Fisher perspective. It’s a micro-cap compounder in an enormous space, and it has an extraordinary board and management team – perhaps among the best management teams in history. Charlie Munger bought this company for $2 million in 1977 with Rick Guerin, who was one of the original “Superinvestors of Grahamand-Doddsville”. Both Rick and Charlie remain on the board to this day. Peter Kaufman, author of “Poor Charlie’s Almanac” and an incredible CEO in his own right at Glenair, also sits on the board.
The board is exceptional. Daily Journal has 10 very specific niche papers that operate in the legal space and are very resilient. For example, they have an internal public disclosure notification business; so when there are foreclosures or estate plans that need to go out publicly, they broker that business.

People think this is a newspaper company, and that’s what people are missing. We basically value the newspapers at zero. During the Great Recession, the newspapers brought in some cash and Rick Guerin and Charlie, being the great investors that they are, invested that cash in the stock market and built a $220 million equity portfolio inside of Daily Journal. The company has a $300 million market cap, with $220 million in real estate, equity, and cash.
Interestingly there's debt, and in finance and accounting we tend to treat all debt as equal. Still, debt can take very different forms. Daily Journal has the best debt I've ever seen. It’s primarily deferred capital gains tax: zero interest, non-callable liabilities owed to the government if and when they sell their securities. It's 100% their decision. They also have a $30 million loan that they used to build their technology business. That’s a margin loan against their very large equity portfolio; it is below 3% interest rate, noncallable, and the dividends from their equity portfolio service the payments. That's very different than a revolving liability at 7% or 8% that has an expiration date and potentially high interest rate. The most important thing, however, is the new technology business. This is something that very few people know about. I've been going to these Daily Journal annual shareholder meetings for eight years, and they say very little about Journal Technologies. The lack of information about this technology group intrigued me. Last year, I found a training conference Daily Journal was holding in Utah for users of their technology, which turned out to be a case management software solution for court houses and municipalities. I couldn't attend the conference because I didn't have the right courthouse credentials. Instead, I booked a room in the hotel, sat in the lobby, and interviewed their customers as they got coffee for three days, before being politely asked to leave by the COO, Jon Peek.
When I left the conference I had learned an enormous amount and had tools to continue my research. I learned that they don't bill until implementation is complete, three or four years after they've won an RFP. This makes their income statement void of much deferred revenue. I also learned that they have these tenure contracts with automatic price increases that will still push right through even during a recession. I learned how much their customers love the products they're providing. It was very eye-opening. I also realized that, to really understand what they were doing I needed to understand who was using their software, because the financial
statements were so incorrect. The company has an ethos of deferred gratification. They look for opportunities to provide services today and get paid tomorrow. When they go into an RFP process against their main competitor, the behemoth Tyler Technologies, they are able to present customers with an opportunity where they will not be billed until the implementation is complete and the court approves the software; many
times that goes out three to four years. When you're up against a strong competitor who would like customers to pay $100,000 a month, it's very valuable to defer the billing to the end. At Daily Journal, they do not report revenue until it is billed and received, despite the fact that they are already performing significant work today. There’s a ton of offfinancial statements’ value and you need to do work to find it. I brought in an intern and we went county by county across America, digging through the tax reports and meeting minutes to find Journal Technologies or Daily Journal being discussed. If we found something, we’d then search for contracts in that county. What we found was incredible. Los Angeles owes them $5 million. Austin, Texas owes them $1 million. Surprise, Arizona, owes them $25,000. Australia owes them at least $16 million, and potentially a whole lot more as of last week. We found over $40 million in revenue that has not been captured on their financial statements . We found over a hundred contracts that are being implemented across the nation. These contracts have recurring license agreements. It's a SaaS business model, with automatic price increases and 10-year lock ups. We believe that within the next 10 years, there'll be at least $150 million in recurring revenue from the technology business.

SaaS is one of the best business models out there today. You create software and it scales around the world. You've probably seen margins of 60%, 70%, 80% in this space. But if you used a simple, very low margin of like 25%, you'd realize they're going to have close to $40 million of EBIDTA in the not too distant future. This whole company is a $300 million market cap business. We're taking the whole newspaper business and saying it’s worth nothing; we're taking the equity portfolio of $220 million and subtracting the “fake” debt of $70 million, so we’re left with $150 million net; and now we need to figure out if Journal Technologies is worth $150 million to cover the current market cap. Well, our models show that this is a $1 billion business in less than 10 years.
 

leonzio22

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
12/7/10
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
77
Sapete quando uscira' la trimestrale ? A chiusura mercato di oggi? Domani? (o e' gia' uscita?)
 

pikimiki

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
19/12/12
Messaggi
4.283
Punti reazioni
71
Sapete quando uscira' la trimestrale ? A chiusura mercato di oggi? Domani? (o e' gia' uscita?)
mi sembra uscita oggi, ma non ho avuto modo di informarmi, credo comunque abbastanza buona visto che sta chiudendo con +1,5%
 

leonzio22

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
12/7/10
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
77
mi sembra uscita oggi, ma non ho avuto modo di informarmi, credo comunque abbastanza buona visto che sta chiudendo con +1,5%

A ME SEMBRA INVECE SIA STATA PUBBLICATA STAMATTINA... RIPORTO A SEGUIRE ARTICOLO DI "SEEKING ALPHA" TRADOTTO IN ITALIANO AUTOMATICAMENTE. MI SEMBRANO, PER QUEL POCO RIPORTATO QUI, RISULTATI MOLTO BUONI.

Gli utili del Berkshire Hathaway Q3 guadagnano sul reddito degli investimenti assicurativi

2 novembre 2019 7:38 ET|Informazioni su: Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (BRK.B) |Di: Liz Kiesche , redattore di notizie SA

Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.B ) (NYSE: BRK.A ) Gli utili operativi del terzo trimestre di $ 7,86 miliardi aumentano del 14% a / a, sugli utili degli investimenti assicurativi; ferrovia, servizi pubblici ed energia; e altro. Per segmento:

La sottoscrizione assicurativa è stata leggermente modificata a $ 440 milioni contro $ 441 milioni nel trimestre dell'anno precedente.

Assicurazione - proventi da investimenti $ 1,48 miliardi, in crescita del 20% a / a.

Ferrovia, servizi pubblici ed energia $ 2,64 miliardi, in crescita del 6,4%.

Altre attività $ 2,46 miliardi contro $ 2,41 miliardi, in crescita dell'1,8%.

Altri $ 835, in crescita del 174%.

Al 30 settembre 2019, il galleggiante assicurativo era ~ $ 127 miliardi, in aumento di $ 4 miliardi dalla fine del 2018.

L'utile netto del terzo trimestre di $ 16,5 miliardi è sceso da $ 18,5 miliardi nel trimestre dell'anno precedente.

Le entrate nette includono investimenti non garantiti in titoli azionari di $ 8,0 miliardi nel terzo trimestre del 2019 e $ 10,2 miliardi nel trimestre dell'anno precedente.

Include anche guadagni realizzati al netto delle imposte sugli investimenti di ~ $ 513 milioni nel terzo trimestre 2019 e $ 955 milioni nel terzo trimestre 2018.

Ricontrolla per gli aggiornamenti; ulteriori informazioni saranno disponibili quando Berkshire presenterà il suo 10-Q alle 8:00 AM ET.
 

leonzio22

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
12/7/10
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
77
c'e' qualcuno che vuole commentare la trimestrale?

grazie..
 

leonzio22

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
12/7/10
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
77
intanto ecco cosa dice Bloomberg...


Il profitto del Berkshire raggiunge un record mentre il mucchio di denaro di Buffett cresce
Di Katherine Chiglinsky
2 novembre 2019, 12:26 CET Aggiornato il 2 novembre 2019, 15:44 CET

L'utile operativo aumenta del 14% sugli utili degli investimenti, aumento della ferrovia
La pila di contanti supera $ 128 miliardi mentre Buffett riacquista alcune azioni
Warren Buffett
L'utile operativo della Berkshire Hathaway Inc. è salito del 14% a un record mentre il conglomerato di Warren Buffett ha visto guadagni dalla sua ferrovia e ha ottenuto alcuni guadagni tanto attesi da Kraft Heinz Co.

Gli utili operativi sono saliti a $ 7,86 miliardi nel terzo trimestre, grazie in parte a un aumento dei proventi da investimenti e al gruppo di riassicurazione del Berkshire che ha registrato il suo primo utile di sottoscrizione dell'anno nonostante le perdite da un tifone giapponese. Le entrate sono aumentate del 2,4% sugli aumenti degli assicuratori e delle imprese manifatturiere.

Nuovo record
Le unità operative del Berkshire hanno registrato il massimo profitto di sempre

I risultati hanno spinto la pila di denaro di Buffett a un record di $ 128 miliardi, anche se ha completato un investimento di $ 10 miliardi in Occidental Petroleum Corp. , il suo acquisto più grosso in più di un anno. A parte questo accordo, Buffett era un venditore netto di azioni nel trimestre e ha riacquistato meno azioni proprie del Berkshire di quanto si aspettassero alcuni analisti, sollevando ulteriori domande su quanto tempo il leggendario investitore aspetterà di usare la sua polvere secca.

"È una quantità oscena di denaro", ha detto Jim Shanahan, analista di Edward Jones, in un'intervista. Tuttavia, i risultati operativi sono stati "davvero forti", ha detto. "Questa è una stampa abbastanza buona."

Il fatto che le imprese tentacolari di Buffett stiano sputando denaro più velocemente di quanto possa trovare buoni posti per investirlo è un problema che molte aziende invidieranno. Ma ci sono segnali che i fondi inutilizzati stiano pesando sulla crescita e che le azioni del Berkshire siano sulla buona strada per la peggiore sottoperformance dal 2009. Le azioni di Classe A della società hanno guadagnato il 5,7% quest'anno grazie alla chiusura di venerdì, a corto della salita del 22% nell'S & P 500 Indice durante quel periodo.

Per saperne di più: la sottoperformance di Buffett ha diviso gli investitori

Il Berkshire ha registrato $ 467 milioni di guadagni relativi alla sua quota dell'utile di Kraft Heinz nei primi nove mesi del 2019. I guadagni sono arrivati ​​subito dopo che la posta ha lasciato un vuoto nei risultati del Berkshire per due trimestri mentre il gigante del cibo confezionato ha ritardato i risultati di comunicazione in mezzo sonde normative.

Buffett è stato punto dagli inciampi di Kraft Heinz nell'ultimo anno. Dopo che Kraft Heinz ha annunciato una svalutazione di $ 15,4 miliardi a febbraio, il Berkshire ha dichiarato che avrebbe preso una commissione di $ 2,7 miliardi sulla sua partecipazione. Kraft Heinz ha pubblicato i risultati del primo semestre in agosto ed è tornato in pista ad ottobre, quando ha registrato un profitto del terzo trimestre che ha battuto le stime degli analisti. Ciò ha portato le azioni a salire ai massimi livelli da maggio, anche se sono ancora ben al di sotto del valore contabile del Berkshire. Il Berkshire ha dichiarato sabato di non ritenere che in questo momento fosse necessaria una svalutazione.

Riacquisti di azioni
La ferrovia di Buffett è stata in grado di aprire tutte le rotte chiave nel terzo trimestre colpite dalle inondazioni. Il guadagno del 5% nella ferrovia del Berkshire, BNSF , ha beneficiato anche di tassi più elevati sulle spedizioni anche se i volumi sono diminuiti.

I riacquisti di $ 700 milioni del Berkshire nel trimestre sono stati un aumento di quasi il 75% rispetto alla quantità di azioni acquistate dalla società nel secondo trimestre. Tuttavia, i riacquisti del terzo trimestre sono stati inferiori al riacquisto record del Berkshire di $ 1,7 miliardi di azioni nel primo trimestre ed è stato inferiore ai $ 900 milioni stimati dagli analisti di UBS Group AG .

Mentre Buffett ha ricevuto una maggiore flessibilità per riacquistare azioni lo scorso anno, i suoi riacquisti sono stati modesti rispetto ad altre società giganti, in particolare le società finanziarie. Bank of America Corp. , che annovera Berkshire tra i suoi maggiori azionisti, ha dichiarato a giugno che prevede di riacquistare oltre $ 30 miliardi di azioni nel corso del prossimo anno.

Altre cifre chiave dai risultati:

I guadagni al lordo del gruppo di produttori del Berkshire, che comprende Precision Castparts Corp. e Marmon, sono aumentati del 4,9% nel terzo trimestre. Ciò è stato favorito dai guadagni di Precision grazie alla domanda di prodotti aerospaziali e aumenti presso Clayton Homes , che produce case mobili e si è espanso nella costruzione di siti.
Gli utili netti sono scesi dell'11% a $ 16,5 miliardi. In base alle nuove regole contabili, il Berkshire deve riportare oscillazioni nel suo portafoglio di investimenti in termini di reddito netto. I guadagni non realizzati nel terzo trimestre sono stati di circa $ 8 miliardi rispetto a un guadagno di $ 10,2 miliardi nello stesso periodo dell'anno precedente.
 

nemo17

Enjoy the Silence
Registrato
20/2/00
Messaggi
7.211
Punti reazioni
332
Mah io sono molto di parte ma credo che i prezzi attuali siano interessanti per accumulare Berkshire.
La liquidità attuale e le azioni in pancia valgono circa 360 miliardi e l'azienda ne capitalizza 560.
Quanto vale il resto ?
Berkshire Energy
Berkshire Insurance
Geico
Bnsf

E tutta la parte retail ?
Chi lo sa... ma un'idea se la si può fare comparando quelle aziende ad altre simili quotate.
Nel frattempo il rapporto price/bv è sull'interessante 1.33.
E tutti i giorni la cassa si ingrossa in attesa di condizioni migliori per qualche grossa acquisizione.
 

leonzio22

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
12/7/10
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
77
..speriamo che ieri siano partiti i riacquisti.. ottimi volumi..
 

Leite

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
16/9/06
Messaggi
3.059
Punti reazioni
150
sull'investimento in arte, dalla lettera alla Buffett Partnership del 1964:

"Since the whole subject of compounding has such a crass ring to it, I will attempt to introduce a little class into this discussion by turning to the art world. Francis I of France paid 4,000 ecus in 1540 for Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. On the off chance that a few of you have not kept track of the fluctuations of the ecu 4,000 converted out to about $20,000.

If Francis had kept his feet on the ground and he (and his trustees) had been able to find a 6% after-tax investment, the estate now would be worth something over $1,000,000,000,000,000.00. That's $1 quadrillion or over 3,000 times the present national debt, all from 6%. I trust this will end all discussion in our household about any purchase or paintings qualifying as an investment.

However, as I pointed out last year, there are other morals to be drawn here. One is the wisdom of living a long
time. The other impressive factor is the swing produced by relatively small changes in the rate of compound."
 

Leite

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
16/9/06
Messaggi
3.059
Punti reazioni
150
non piccola la riduzione di Wells (anche se può essere solo per rimanere sotto la soglia del 10%):
Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway reveals new stake in furniture retailer RH


su buyback e valore intrinseco dalla lettera del '96:

"If you’re repurchasing shares above a rationally calculated intrinsic value, you are harming your shareholders, just as if you issue shares beneath that figure, you are harming your shareholders.
That’s a truism. Now, the tough part of that, of course, is coming up with the intrinsic value.
A good example might be Coca-Cola.
I think a number of people might have thought Coca-Cola was repurchasing shares at a very high price, because they’ll look at book value or P/E ratios. But there’s a lot more to intrinsic value than book value and P/E ratios. And anytime anybody gives you some simplified formula for figuring it out, forget it.
You have to understand the business. The people who understood that business well, the management, have understood and been very forthright about saying so over the years, that by repurchasing their shares, they are adding to the value per share for remaining shareholders.
And like I say, people who didn’t understand Coca-Cola, or who thought mechanistic methods of valuation should take precedence, really misjudged the value to the Coca-Cola Company of those repurchases.
So we favor — when you have a wonderful business — we favor using funds that are generated out of that business to make the business even more wonderful. And we favor repurchasing shares if those shares are below intrinsic value.
And I would say that if it’s a really wonderful business, we probably come up with higher intrinsic values than most people do.
We have great respect, Charlie and I with — I think it’s developed over the years — we have enormous respect for the power of a really outstanding business. And we recognize how scarce they are. And if a management wishes to further intensify our ownership by repurchasing shares, we applaud.
We own — we just went over 8 percent of the Coca-Cola Company, probably, in the last three or so months, by a very tiny fraction. But we had a second purchase one time.
But our percentage interest in the Coca-Cola Company has gone up significantly through their repurchases. And we are better off because they have bought those shares at what looked like, to some people, perhaps, high prices. And we thought they were wrong at the time, and I think now it’s been indicated or proven.
So, I urge you, if you’re trying to decide on the wisdom of repurchases, or of share issuances, that you don’t think in terms of book value. You don’t think in terms of specific P/Es. You don’t think in terms of any little model.
But you think in terms of what would you really... A) pick businesses you can understand; and then think what you really would pay to be in those businesses. And that’s what counts over time, is whether the repurchases are made at a discount from that figure.
And I would say with the companies that we own shares in — our interest in GEICO went from 33 or so percent to 50 percent over a 15-year or so period, simply through repurchases. And we benefited significantly.
So did every other shareholder, I might add, that stayed with the company. And we benefited in no way disproportionate to them.
But that was a very wise action on their part. And there too, they were usually buying that stock at at least double book value. And you could compare it to other insurance stocks and say, “Well, that’s too much to pay.”
But GEICO wasn’t an insurance company that was comparable to other insurance companies. It was a very different sort of business. And they were very wise, in my view, to be following that course of action."
 

pmc

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
13/12/09
Messaggi
1.707
Punti reazioni
69
Ha fatto quasi più movimenti nell'ultimo trimestre del 2018 che in 9 mesi di quest'anno, 17 contro 23
Nonostante sia propenso a mantenere piuttosto che vendere e nonostante abbia la cifra mastodontica di 128B di liquidità in continua crescita, ha preferito vendere o comunque ridurre le partecipazioni.
4 Riduzioni, nello specifico in Wells Fargo, Apple, Phillips 66 e Sirius XM, contro due piccoli acquisti su RH e Occidental Petroleum, quest'ultima favorita anche dal prestito per il deal con Anadarko... al contrario Icahn si era messo contro al deal. Infatti, nello stesso trimestre ha ridotto la partecipazione del 21%.
Chi avrà ragione? Il saggio Buffett o l'astuto Icahn?... e intanto il titolo da fine Giugno ad oggi è sceso del 23% :rolleyes:
 

dnt

value investing
Registrato
31/7/04
Messaggi
3.822
Punti reazioni
219
Chi avrà ragione? Il saggio Buffett o l'astuto Icahn?... e intanto il titolo da fine Giugno ad oggi è sceso del 23% :rolleyes:

Negli ultimi anni Buffett mi sembra sia calato molto: l'età ha il suo peso, il mercato sta cambiando velocemente, la BRK è troppo grande per pensare di gestirla come un'azienda di famiglia. Prima se compravi BRK compravi le scelte di Buffett e la loro qualità, ora non è più così.
 

Felix_87

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
16/9/16
Messaggi
1.570
Punti reazioni
98
Ha fatto quasi più movimenti nell'ultimo trimestre del 2018 che in 9 mesi di quest'anno, 17 contro 23
Nonostante sia propenso a mantenere piuttosto che vendere e nonostante abbia la cifra mastodontica di 128B di liquidità in continua crescita, ha preferito vendere o comunque ridurre le partecipazioni.
4 Riduzioni, nello specifico in Wells Fargo, Apple, Phillips 66 e Sirius XM, contro due piccoli acquisti su RH e Occidental Petroleum, quest'ultima favorita anche dal prestito per il deal con Anadarko... al contrario Icahn si era messo contro al deal. Infatti, nello stesso trimestre ha ridotto la partecipazione del 21%.
Chi avrà ragione? Il saggio Buffett o l'astuto Icahn?... e intanto il titolo da fine Giugno ad oggi è sceso del 23% :rolleyes:

Questo è un errore che fanno anche i giornalisti che non conoscono bene come opera la Berkshire.
A mio modo di vedere anche chi non ascolta le sue interviste e/o non legge bene le lettere finanziarie.
Nella berkshire ci sono due gestori di portafoglio che anch'essi si occupano in maniera indipendente di acquistare titoli. Sono Weschler e Combs.
Entrambi hanno 10 miliardi a testa e devo cercare di battere il mercato usa.
Questi trade tra cui vendita di apple ecc.cifre sostanzialmente basse sono fatte molto probabilmente da loro, per Buffett è inutile muovere meno di 10 miliardi se non per aggiusti legali e tecnici di struttura di investimento.
Weshler e Combs hanno bisogno di vendere e acquistare per poter aggiungere titoli in portafoglio visto che "solo" 10 miliardi hanno a disposizione.
Infatti nell'ultima intervista a CNBC alla domanda sul perchè aveva venduto azioni apple, rispose che lui non ha mai venduto apple, e che erano stati o Weschler o Combs o entrambi nella loro gestione.
 

pmc

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
13/12/09
Messaggi
1.707
Punti reazioni
69
Questo è un errore che fanno anche i giornalisti che non conoscono bene come opera la Berkshire.
A mio modo di vedere anche chi non ascolta le sue interviste e/o non legge bene le lettere finanziarie.
Nella berkshire ci sono due gestori di portafoglio che anch'essi si occupano in maniera indipendente di acquistare titoli. Sono Weschler e Combs.
Entrambi hanno 10 miliardi a testa e devo cercare di battere il mercato usa.
Questi trade tra cui vendita di apple ecc.cifre sostanzialmente basse sono fatte molto probabilmente da loro, per Buffett è inutile muovere meno di 10 miliardi se non per aggiusti legali e tecnici di struttura di investimento.
Weshler e Combs hanno bisogno di vendere e acquistare per poter aggiungere titoli in portafoglio visto che "solo" 10 miliardi hanno a disposizione.
Infatti nell'ultima intervista a CNBC alla domanda sul perchè aveva venduto azioni apple, rispose che lui non ha mai venduto apple, e che erano stati o Weschler o Combs o entrambi nella loro gestione.

Hai ragione. In effetti questo discorso era uscito anche quando è comparsa Teva nel ptf e disse che non centrava nulla.
Quella dei 10 miliardi a testa come sfida a battere il mercato però non la sapevo :bow:
 

Leite

Nuovo Utente
Registrato
16/9/06
Messaggi
3.059
Punti reazioni
150
deal sfumato:
Warren Buffett's latest attempt to put his cash to work is thwarted




"Charlie and I don’t have the faintest idea what our cost of capital is at Berkshire, and we think the whole concept is a little crazy, frankly. But it’s something that’s taught in the business schools, and you have to be able to answer the questions or you don’t get out of business school. But we have a very simple arrangement in terms of what we do with money—we look for the most intelligent thing we can find to do.... And so, we measure alternatives against each other, and we measure alternatives against dividends, and we measure alternatives against repurchase of shares. But I have never seen a cost of capital calculation that made sense to me."

Warren Buffett